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states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound dug-in on capitol hill. >> all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it ne
. jenna: well do you like your internet just open and free. jon: i do, that's how i prefer it. jenna: a u.n. agency wants to -- well, maybe oversee the internet a little bit, create some new laws maybe for the internet. jon: they are so good at running things they are. jenna: there is an idea out there that the u.n. may put in some sort of new regulation for the internet. are they the right people to do it? what about sensor ships. big questions for our country and the web. we'll tell you about it next hour. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain th
that resulted in the voting down of a u.n. treaty aimed at spreading rights for disabled people. even the venerable bob dole could not bring both sides together on this one. also major unrest in egypt as 100,000 protesters stormed the palace in cairo forcing president morsi to flee. we'll update you on the situation there. but first our top story live here at 5:30 a.m. at 30 rock in new york city. and we begin with the latest on the rapidly approaching fiscal cliff deadline of automatic tax hikes on everybody and what appears to be a stalemate in the negotiations. in his first interview since the election, president obama reiterated his demand that any deal must raise taxes on the highest earner. yesterday obama also appeared to showroom for flexibility on actually relowering those tax rates in the future. >> i don't think that the issue right now has to do with sitting in a room. the issue right now that's relevant is the acknowledgement that if we're going to raise revenues that are sufficient to balance with the very tough cuts that we've already made and the further reforms and en
that has tossed a country into chaos. team fox coverage continues now. jonathan hunt at the u.n. jonathan, this looks like the beginning of an end game to many. >> yeah. it certainly does. the rebels have clearly taken the decision within the past week that they cannot bring about the downfall of the assad regime without taking the battle directly to the capital damascus. they do not, however, yet have the fire power to win in one big final assault. so this is likely to be a war of attrition within damascus itself and president assad has gathered his hot best trained troops around his strong holds within the capital so this may well go on for days. butng to a lot of experts, the pressure on president assad is growing day by day. and that is why there is the concern about the use of these chemical weapons because they say in many ways now, president assad is like a cornered rat. shep? >> shepard: jonathan, still so many questions about what happens after assad. >> yeah, and that's one of the problems here for the international community. we have heard again and again just how many factions
with the -- with what happened in congress yesterday, the lack of support in the united states senate for the u.n. but the u.n. process really has to go forward and has to be the leader on syria. >> i just don't think it's helpful to americans when so many senior politicians trash the u.n. you know? it's the united nations. and actually, it's better for america. >> absolutely. >> the united nations takes a lot of the work on the ground in these places. >> you're absolutely right. but there's human rights abuses that are exploding all over the world. and one that we're working very hard on right now is in uganda. there's anti-homosexuality bill that would make homosexual acts punishment by the death penalty. >> completely outrageous. >> it is. and the speaker of the house there said she's going to deliver this bill as a christmas present. so, we have 2 1/2 weeks to stop that bill right now. >> imagine. it's disgusting, isn't it? >> it certainly is. as people across this state, we're in new york state. you don't need a passport to work on human rights. right here, we're working on the farm workers
with her counterpart, russian minister lab rov and a u.n. special envoy on the side of an international security conference she is taking part in. russia is one of syria's main allies but have opposed and opposed any u.n. measures against him up until this point. if clinton can submit russian support the u.n. security council might be able to pass a sanctions resolution against the syrian government particularly because of the chemical weapons issue. on wednesday in brussels clinton also renewed support for the syrian opposition. is there an exit strategy for assad? though the u.n. secretary of general said yesterday the world should not let him seek asylum senator kerry told andrea mitchell he disagrees. >> it's in our security interests to be able to get a transition that is controlled and that is negotiated and that is orderly because the alternative to that is you could have 200,000, 500,000 people killed. >> if syria crosses the red line in chemical weapons what will the u.s. do? middle east expert jeffrey goldberg joins us on the escalating violence across the region in a scoop th
? election coming up? what happened in the u.n.? what's the feeling there? >> well, certainly the israelis have made no secret of the fact that this is a direct punitive measure for what happened at the u.n. last thursday where, of course, the palestinians managed get an upgraded status there in the u.n. general assembly going to nonmember observer state. of course, the word state there is the operative one for the palestinians. the palestinians now say they do, in fact, have a state which is a taertory that is defined as the west bank, gaza, and east jerusalem. so, therefore, the palestinians are saying that this obviously would make the implementation of this state all but impossible because they say it would be impossible for them to even reach their capital that they want to have, which is, of course, east jerusalem. this is certainly a measure that's cause aing lot of international controversy. you were saying that great britain and france have already put out staunch statements aimed at the israelis. the israelis are saying, yes, all these countries have voiced their concern. they're
or whether he can be persuaded to say asylum but that has the u.n. secretary-general having misgivings giving a man who has murdered 40,000 of his own people to give him retirement in a safe and friendly country. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity after gross violation of human rights. he must be held accountable and brought to justice>>jonathan: tf the argument is that any kind of solution that would persuade assad to stand down and end the slaughter of all of those syrian civilians might, actually, be worth considering. >>trace: what do we know of the reports that rebels are trying to get their act together in terms of leadership? >>jonathan: they trying to bring about some political unity. that is far easier said that done because there are so many different and disparate groups including al qaeda fighter whose have swarmed into syria and now you part of the fighting and part of the battle to oust president assad. so, it is not very easy. the next stage of trying to bring about some sort of political unity will unfold in morocco next week, the next meeting of the "friends of
-to-face negotiations will lead to a lasting peace. meantime just after the u.n. vote, israel approved construction of new housing in the west bank in ears jerusalem. palestinian leaders said that would not return to the peace talks unless and until israel freezes that construction and it doesn't appear it's happening. they also say they want to return to the pre1967 borders whereby israel would give back the west bank east jerusalem and gaza. back to the early days of the internet. nobody knew how big it would become. obviously. and that's why representatives from around the world are getting together to rewrite the rules for the internet. this is fascinating and what they have in mind could change everything we know about the internet. we have in-depth report coming. plus, after losing the latino vote in a big way in the 2012 election. republicans are now pushing for new immigration plan in congress. it is not going over well with everybody as you might imagine. that's next. you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® fo
been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the biggest challenge for people today is distance. as the epidemic subsided over the last few months many treatment centers have been closed in the remote areas. getting to plays that remain open is a huge challenge that can take hours. and that delay can be fatal. this man, a 27-year-old mother of three, will lik
that israel seized during the 1967 middle east war. israel announced the plan in retaliation to thursday's u.n. resolution vote to upgrade palestine's status as a nonmember observer state. u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon says the move to expand settlements would almost certainly be a, quote, fatal blow, end quote, to any chance of achieving peace with the palestinians. israel also says it's withholding more than $100 million in tax revenue from the financially troubled palestinian authority. instead using the money to repay a debt owed to israel's electric company for supplying power to parts of the west bank. >>> turning to education and some news that could soon have a major impact on your kid's school day. starting next fall, districts will expand the school day, adding as much as 300 hours to the calendar. it's all part of a theree-year plan aimed at boosting achievement and making the u.s. more competitive. schools will be part of the pilot program, but educators hope to add additional communities. education secretary arne duncan has been pushing for more time in the classroom for the
points. >> brand-new reaction today from the potential nominee of u.n. ambassador susan rice to be the next secretary of state. a senator reiterating concerns about statements she made following the benghazi attack that left four americans dead. in the meantime, clare mccaskill came to the ambassador's defense. >> she had reviewed the dpeor foer going. >> on sunday shows and went well beyond the talking points, we have decimated al-qaeda, that was nowhere on the talking points, said things the attack was a result of a heinous and offensive video. said the security at our consulate and strong and significant. that is not in the talking points and frankly not supported by the record of what happened. >> the talking points came from the intelligence community. you don't hear one criticism of david petraeus. it was his shop that produced the talking points that susan rice talked about. is there a double standard here? it appears there is, very unfair one. >> gregg: last week rice met with members of the senate armed services committee to try to explain the situation. lindsay grah
, the foreign policy team. >> we saw this joking moment, let me replay it, a news conference to push the u.n. treaty on disabilities which -- >> which is going to -- may fail. >> which is unbelievable since america has been -- >> very surprising. >> way out front since the days of bush '41 and tom harken was the big -- >> bob dole. >> and john mccain today made a plea for bob dole who is in walter reed he wants to see this great moment, a worldwide standard, it would be good for business, but as you pointed out on the daily rundown today, the chamber of commerce supports this, selling wheelchairs -- >> around the world. >> and here, it's stalemate. it needs two-thirds, more than 60. this is a treaty. because it has u.n. attached to it -- >> going to say it's brand, it's about brand. >> at that moment with mccain and john kerry because of foreign relations issue and this is the way mccain sort of gigged john kerry and kerry teased him back. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> thank you very much, mr. president. >> and there was a lot of joking after that. a lot of laughing. >> we should
and north korea and egypt. a u.n. conference in dubai is underway right now. new questions about internet freedom. two dozen countries, including iran, syria, north korea, could be making decisions affecting communications worldwide. catherine herridge has more in washington. reporter: thank you, megyn, and good afternoon. the international telecommunications union, this conference in dubai is viewing rules established long before the internet became a primary method of communication. the u.n. body could impact every day vacation. >> this could affect every cell phone tablet personal computer in the world. pretty much every chip in every type of consumer devices have an ip address associated with them. therefore, there are proposals that the there be a registry for each of those computer chips. reporter: the u.s. is in support of what is called web neutrality. the conference raises the specter of nations, including iran, china, and russia, agreeing to live under the u.n. rules, which critics say are restrictions. critics say that it is part of a steady drip drip of regulations that will c
of the u.n. environment program and we asked him if anything at all could come out of this conference. >> we still have to give you a days ago, and i believe there will be a number of outcomes. the green climate fund, the kyoto protocol extension -- these are fundamental building blocks of an international climate process, but ever since copenhagen, we are pursuing a search for a new framework for global climate cooperation, and doha in itself will not deliver that. we should also recognize that these conferences have not provided us with a single framework, but they have triggered all across the world immense initiatives in the direction of a low-carbon economy, and i think these are also a byproduct of this process, and we need to recognize them because they are part of building our ability to move towards a low-carbon future. nevertheless, doha should at a minimum enable us to keep the process moving forward. in itself, it has not delivered a breakthrough. that is clear. >> that was the head of the united nations' environment program. now we had a championship talk -- soccer, and l
: a shocking real-life health crisis involving a former child star, why frankie m u.n. iz was rushed to the hospital. we are live at the breaking news desk. the new nears about chemical weapons in the civil war rocking syria, why the u.s. and the international community should be concerned. we'll go in-depth with ambassador bolton. jenna: right now we are learning about a serious health problem for a former child star, rick folbaum is live at the breaking news news desk with more. >> reporter: you don't usually hear about healthy 20 somethings having strokes. that's what doctors say happened to frankly m u.n. is. he was riding his motorcycle in phoenix when he lost vision in one eye. friends, including his fiancee got worried when he was acting very strangely. turns out he was having a mini stroke. here he is on "good morning america." >> something wasn't right. i knew i did not feel right. coy -pbt say words. couldn't say words. i thought i was saying them. my fiancee was looking at me like i was speaking a foreign language. maybe i had a bad headache, i don't know. i've never had a
failed to pass a u.n. disability treaty by just five votes. combat veterans like senators john mccain and john kerry delivered impassioned speeches, but dissenting voters said the treaty could pose a threat to national sovereignty. this is a stretch. more than 150 countries have signed the treaty designed to create unilateral rights for people with disabilities. it's actually based on america's ada act which bob dole helped pass more than 20 years ago. and you know, andrea, watching this american hero on the floor, a guy who is disabled, left part of himself, as he has said and others have said, on the battlefields of western europe, coming in and making a plea. i'm really surprised that this was killed by fringe concerns, fringe, fringe concerns. >> and it was, in fact, his fellow senators, several of the people who served with bob dole, who were the key votes here. and john kerry was leading it on the floor with john mccain. it was one of those bipartisan coalitions of veterans, wounded veterans, mccain and others, and the wounded warriors. the chamber of commerce. this is basic
a joint u.n. afghan base. it happened in eastern afghanistan. there are no immediate reports of any casualties. the taliban is claiming responsibility for the attack. joining me now by phone from kabul is journalist ben farmer. ben, the attack is being described as, quote, complex. can you walk us through what happened? >> well, it does seem to be complex and ambitious. it began at about 6:00 local time this morning, just after dawn. it began with two suicide car bomb attacks, attacking the gate of the airfield. the vehicles were packed with explosives and driven towards the gate and detonated. followed a wave of suicide attackers armed with assault rifles, some also wearing suicide vests. they started to attack the gate guards and guards on the walls. it was a two-hour fire fight. during that fire fight, helicopters took off from the airfield to join in the battle to fire down on the attackers. the fire fight took about two hours, at the end of which all the attackers were dead. we believe there were about nine in total, including those in the suicide car bombs. now, the coalition
. the senate has managed to vote on something, rejected a u.n. treaty to extend rights to the blind and disabled, rights that have been the law of the land here in the united states since 1990. despite an emotional appearance from bob dole just out of walter reed, 89 years old, a passionate advocate for equal rights for the disabled since his first speech on the senate floor in 1969. joining me for our daily fix, kra, managing editor of post politics.com and capitol hill correspondents, nbc's kelly o'donnell and luke russert. kelly, to you, because this vote in the senate, john kerry led the way, it was bipartisan, in support. they needed 6 votes. it's a treaty, two-thirds of the senate and it failed. talk to me about all the ramifications here. >> it's not that often andrea, you know this, when votes on the senate floor can draw such powerful emotions and even tears from members of the gallery who attend in the public seats that are not in camera view. but we had that today. there was strong, passionate feelings about this for those in support of the treaty, which essentially as th
kerry is firing back at senator rick santorum. it's all about this. opposition to a u.n. treaty. one that a lot of people thought was a no-brainer. it was about the rights of the disabled all over the world. we brought you this story yesterday. senate republicans rejecting this treaty on tuesday despite the fact that one of their own, bob dole, bob dole, a former majority leader, came to the floor in a wheelchair trying to draw support for this treaty. he was being pushed by his wife and made an impassioned plea. senator santorum explained opposition to this treaty in a piece published in "the daily beast." in part he says this. our nation has been been the worldwide leader when it comes to protecting the disabled. we should be telling the u.n. and not the other way around how to ensure dignity and respect for the disabled. effectively saying nobody tells the united states what to do. it sets a very dangerous precedent perhaps for other things. okay. that sounded legitimate until it came out that that's not what the treaty suggests. senator kerry was mincing absolutely no words in sa
of israel. they need only the majority of the u.n. members to approve. >>> and in the u.s., the kansas city chiefs will play today, despite a personal tragedy for the team. chiefs linebacker eer jovan be shot and killed his girlfriend yesterday before heading to the practice facility where he turned the gun on himself in front of the coach and general manager. >>> more top stories at the top of the hour when "cnn sunday morning" continues. see you then. sanjay gupta m.d. begins right now. >>> hey, there. thanks for being with us. this weekend we're marking world a.i.d.s. day. i'm going to look at a tough issue that might surprise you. question is this, if someone has sex with a partner and doesn't tell them they have hiv, should they be punished? and if so, how? >> plus, a new food trend. i promise you this is healthy. the question is, would you really want a bite of this? >>> first, more than 7 million americans suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, ptsd. the nightmares, flashback, anxiety, it can be debilitating to the point where a normal life is simply impossible. at least half t
of the architects that designed the u.n. headquarters in new york, a project that began in 1947. in 1956, niemeyer created a series of landmark structures for brazil's new capital city of brasilia. these include the national congress, the presidential palace, the cathedral, and the contemporary art museum. the entire city of brasilia was later designated a unesco world heritage site. niemeyer was noted for his inventive curving designs. the architect continued working until his 100th birthday. he succumbed to a lung infection at a hospital in his home city of rio de janeiro on wednesday. >>> typhoon bopha is now moving off the philippines. meteorologist robert speta has been following the storm. robert, tell us the latest. >>> well, right now the storm is out over the south china sea, so good news here. the center of circulation continuing to meander off here towards the west, and it does look like it's going to be remaining in place. and actual through intensity in the long range may just be very well winding down out over the open ocean here so, very good news as far as that. but still some mois
or russia. u.n. secretary general was asked about the asylum question today he did not seem to favor the idea. listen. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity whoever commits gross violation of human rights must be held accountable and should be brought to justice. >> that sentiment was echoed by officials at the u.s. state department who said there has to be, quote: accountability. the counter argument to that is that perhaps anything that gets assad out of syria and stops the slaughter of civilians might be worth thinking about, harris. >> some people may be wondering what happens if in fact assad does go. we still haven't seen united opposition of all those rebels to replace him. >> we certainly have not seen anything like a united opposition. the rebels say that he they are seeking more of a unified political leadership but it is hard to come by because there are so many groups involved in pposition movement from secular democrats who began this simply as a way to gain more democracy in syria to hard line islamist and even al qaeda groups. one of those hard line groups
as u.n. ambassador but i haven't made a decision about secretary of state. >> tomorrow on capitol hill, second round of closed classified briefings will be held for members of the house. testimony from the nation top intelligence officer among others. aside from the c.i.a. talking points, lawmakers say they want more definitive information on the level of premedication by the terrorists and how early it was known. bret? >> bret: thank you. >>> still ahead -- what is the big hold up for obamacare? first, president george w. bush on the piece of the economic recovery. it might surprise you. side is frightful ♪ ♪ but the fire is so delightful ♪ nothing melts away the cold like a hot, delicious bowl of chicken noodle soup from campbell's. ♪ let it snow, let it snow can i still ship a gift in time r christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. >>> three, two one. take a look at the lighting of a capitol christmas tree an hour ago. 73-foot spruce. deco
violation of a u.n. security council resolution, and we encourage the leadership in north korea to consider what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems th
conference in ireland. the special u.n. envoy to syria was at the meeting said they agreed to seek a, quote, creative solution to the syrian crisis. jim miklaszewski joins us with the latest. let's talk about the information that nbc reported regarding the syrian military and its actions right now. >> to be clear the precursor of chemicals or at least a couple that actually when combined chemically create that deadly nerve gas. we've been told by u.s. sources those precursor chemicals have been preloaded now into aerial bombs that could be dropped from the fighter bombers onto the syrian people. as of this afternoon there is still no indication that the syrians have actually put -- attempted to put those weapons on aircraft or that there's been a final fatal order from president assad to carry out any kind of attack. so it appears right now that they are in at least the preparation mode, but they're really just one step away from actually carrying out those chemical weapons attacks. we heard secretary panetta say today that the latest intelligence on what's going on with those chemical weap
will be meeting with her russian counterpart and that u.n. envoy talking about syria. the u.s. and russia have been on opposite sides of that conflict in sirah -- conflict in syria. however today's meeting is suggesting a possible compromising. all of this comes as fox news reports, the syrian military is mixing deadly chemical weapons. the syrian government has not confirmed they have these weapons, saying only it could not use -- it would not use that type of weapon against its people. president obama has warned of serious consequences if the syrian government uses those chemicals in that civil war. >>> allegations of spying on the high seas. the america's cup controversy involving the oracle racing team. >>> and we're looking live outside of traffic. that's the bay bridge toll plaza. tara is coming back, one more commute look. >>> in about 30 minutes a hearing will get underway in san francisco to determine the fate of a pit -- pit bull that attacked a u.s. park patrol officer's horse. the horse named stony was bitten by a pit bull named charlie at crissy field back in august. animal offici
. without having to go through congress were without having to get ratification of the u.n. treaty. megyn: it is another system. it looks kind of like cap-and-trade from what i'm reading. where have you, and west virginia, if you want to have a certain number of coal power plants come you have to trade -- there can only be one toll number of omissions and the states have to work it out amongst themselves. >> that is unlikely to go into effect. it would be too hard to pull that out. that is what this group is talking about. the epa really doesn't need to worry about that. they can just crack down on industry on their own. congressman stutzman, and there are enough democrats bases that may join with republicans to push back the epa. in all likelihood, the president found the sweet spot where he can go out there and his team can go out there and really crack down on carbon emissions and deal with global warming, but do it in a way that doesn't require approval. megyn: what happens if you violate the new epa standards? reporter: the people that run the plants will be fined into oblivion. it w
to be on the u.n. security council. going there and making a personal investment has a real strategic purpose. the same goes for all the tiny pacific islands. look at the future of asia, look at the voting dynamics in key international institutions, you start to understand the value of paying attention to these places. let me add that in recent months we have been reminded once again -- by its very nature, american diplomacy must be practiced in dangerous places. the men and women who serve our country overseas represent the best traditions of a bald and generous nation. they are no stranger to danger, from tehran and beirut to east africa and saudi arabia, and now in benghazi and so many other places in between. we have seen diplomats and development experts devoted to peace who are targeted by terrorists devoted to death. that is why we are taking immediate steps to bolster security and readiness at our missions across the globe. we have already dispatched joint teams from the departments of state and defense to review high brett posts to determine if there are improvements we need in light
years we have never received any claim from the republic of china, and after the u.n. report, they changed his position on this subject to claim the island. today, i don't want to get into the details of the island. this is forum and just have global nervous. but i'd like to point, you know, the audience to the two elements. this is not -- in south china sea, china is trying to advance. with the philippines and vietnam and other countries. they claim the islands at least in south china sea. east china sea there is an issue with japan. and from japan, -- [inaudible] the taiwan, the philippines, this is called -- from the viewpoint of china. violence exists in the pacific. china openly express their strong interest in the maritime security and also the territory along those islands. so these china sea, this is not isolated when. this is a kind of china military strategy to advance. >> that's an important point. which are basically saying this is about power. and a powerful which china is going to become more powerful. they are powerful to write history. we write history. you ar
with the russian foreign minister and the u.n. mediator in syria today in brevlin. >> let's talk about those meetings. >> you can be sure that this issue of chemical weapons will be at the top of the list. >> no question about that. what are the options there? what can the international community do at this point if, in fact, they are already in a position where they're loading these components on to the weapons? >> well, one is this public message from the united states, from the nato secretary general and from the russians. the syrian government, including assad personally, will be held accountable. second is perhaps to see if the russians can use their influence. they're the big egest arms supplier to syria, the biggest ally that syria has, to dissuade the syrians from letting this chemical weapons loose or using them against the rebel alliance. if assad should fall and there's a chaotic period of time where no one is in charge of the government in damascus, if one of those radical rebel groups gets control of chemical weapons, that could be potentially very, very dangerous and that might
violate u.n. resolutions and could be is that the stabilize the korean peninsula. russia and china are urging north korea to not proceed with the planned rocket launchers. >> it is now 948 and changes are coming to an said gramm and twitter. our mt. tam cam is stop and with great skies. we have great skies around the bay area but no rain. we will be right back. >> cal has a new football coach sonny dikes and hopes that the offense of mastermind can revive the program has struggled in recent years under the fire just transferred. the eggs had a 22 and 15 record with the bulldogs averaging just under 36 points and 452 and a half yards per game in his tenure. nhl labor talks continue again today after they met for nearly nine hours yesterday. there'll be an internal meeting first and then meeting with the nhl again. the owners want a 10 year contract and the players want a shorter one. today will be a third straight day of talks attempting to settle the dispute that is starting to the entire hockey season. the lockout is now on its 82nd day. >> the price of crab this holiday season co
at state where she doesn't have a good record and her u.n. record is not good. we don't have time to go through the particulars, but i think senator kerry would not only be the policy and political wiser choice. >> everything i've read about ambassador rice, she's imminently qualified for the job. >> you guys can continue this conversation at home right now. thanks to both of you for joining us. >>> the royal line of succession could soon be adding a new name. britain is buzz right now over the news the royal family is about to add another member. ll t in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. >>> catherine duchess of cambridge is pregnant. cnn's royal correspondent max foster is at the epicenter of the madness that's going on right now. the hospital where the duchess has been admitted with acute morning sickness. max, give us the latest. >> reporter: well, i think we're going to be here for months now, wolf. but certainly the kucduchess of
, the u.n. i understand the frustrations of the israelis and the presen situation. but the fact is, when all of that frustration is done, you have to get back to the reality. and the reality is there is only one way of stabilizing the situation and that is getting back to a credible negotiation with a frame work shaping it that allows us to negotiate a two-state solution. i still believe despite people saying there's no way it can happen, it's the only answer. >> is there any hope in the immediate future, those talks, direct face-to-face negotiations between the israelis and palestinians will get off the ground? >> it's possible. we've discussed this many times, wolf. most of the time we've been talking about the latest impact. but president obama has been re-elected here in the u.s. i know he feels deeply about this issue. he regards peace between israelis and palestinians as a genuine strategic interest of the united states. and we're going to have i think a fresh opportunity to go back to this issue to try and grip it and frame it in the right way and we've got to try. i always say to
special sessions of the u.n. human rights council in geneva. they come up with strong resolutions that what is happening in syria are crimes against humanity. they establish an inquiry to investigate these crimes. the convince the security council to bring the crimes to the international criminal court. none of this happens. this is why the credibility of the international justice system, which supports the international criminal court, as a guardian of the international justice system -- it is at stake. this is why the swiss government -- they come up with an initiative which, until now, 40 countries signed this initiative. they called many members in africa, in europe, in the international community, to support and to call to arms the security council, to refer that crimes happened to the international criminal court. the second issue -- the necessary support to the situation on the ground, according to the syrians. as i said before, the gap from the international community and what is going on the ground -- we have to reconcile the and the syrians -- they do not call for humani
not undercut actual wages paid to u.s. workers with similar levels of experience. i have witnessed over the last decade n scrupulous employers who dramatically eroded wages, not for competitive reasons, but solely to transfer wealth from workers to executives. they were successful only because workers were hungry for jobs and willing to work for nearly any wage. the medium household income dropped by $3,700 in that time while executive pay skyrocketed. even as our economy tanked. by contrast, the bill we are debating today does not include wage protections and does not adequately ensure that american workers are protected. equally important is that h.r. 6412 preserves the diversity visa program, ensuring equally opportunity to work in our great land. democrats and republicans alike have forwarded great wisdom towards this issue. now is the time to cooperate with one another and craft a truly bipartisan approach to immigration reform that provides for equality of opportunity for all of those who seek the benefit of u.s. citizenship. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's tim
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